Friday, 29 September 2017

High Fives - September 29, 2017




High Fives are articles or blog posts I have read during the week that I find interesting, and perhaps are pertinent to my research. Sometimes there are only a couple and sometimes there are quite a few.




~by Pat Richley-Ericksone at Dear Myrtle
Anyone wondering how to start the process of becoming certified should start here. Good tips and advice.


~by Melissa Finlay at Boundless Genealogy
Huh!  I guess I have more work to do… my scanned photos are the digital equivalent of being jumbled in a box.


~at Family Tree Blog
I wish someone had told me this before I visited my first ancestor cemetery!






For more exciting weekend reading, see what posts these bloggers liked...

Saturday – Gail Dever, Crème de la Crème

Sunday – Randy Seaver, Best of the Genea-Blogs





Wednesday, 27 September 2017

Canada 150 - St François, Trois Rivières







During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.

Today I have for you...



 St. François, 1844



An accounting of each property owner in the Parish of St François, and how much they had to contribute towards the building of a new church. 





DISTRICT OF TROIS-RIVIERES
PARISH OF ST FRANCOIS
"Acte de cotisation de la paroisse de St François district susdit, pour subvenir aux dépenses nécessaire à la contruction d'une Eglise et dépendances, dans la dite paroisse, suivant le dévis et estimation annexéà la suite du présent."
"Act of Contributions for the Parish of St François, abovementioned district, in order to provide for the necessary expenses for the construction of a Church and outbuildings in the said parish, according to the estimate and appendices appended hereto."

I just wish they had scanned the book with the pages that go together opposite, but no, once you find the name you have to turn to the next page for the information that goes with that property owner. At least it was done. 



This one I put together properly


The headings are: 
- name of property owner
- real 
- putative 
- residence 
- land 
- emplacements 
- size of property 
- built properties 
- value of each property 
- contributions for each property 
- contributions for each property owner.


The residences named are mostly in 
St François, but a few are in Yamaska, Montreal, Sorel, St Aimé, St David, Nicolet, La Baie, Quebec.

At the end there is a list of needed materials and their cost, giving an estimate to build the church of 
4231 13s 6d.



Relevant Links


(Various contracts concerning the parish of St. François du Lac, 1844) 




Tuesday, 26 September 2017

Solving Mysteries From Other People's Trees.



My maternal grandmother Sarah Myrtle King, was pretty good at writing names and dates on her photos. But there was one, I assumed a wedding photo, of a couple that intrigued me and she had written only a date, 1914. I checked and double checked, none of her siblings and none of my grandfather's siblings married in 1914. No one that I could find connected to that family married in 1914. It has remained a mystery to me for over 30 years...





... until now!

Giving a little background, my 2x great grandparents, George and Elizabeth (Nichols) King immigrated to Montreal from Devon, England c1857. They had five sons, one being my great grandfather Clement King. They also had one daughter Sarah Ann King, who I could not trace past the 1881 census. There were just too many Sarah Kings in the 1800s, and none of the ones in Ancestry results fit. Often what I do when I can't find  a person, is in Ancestry I do a search for that name in members' Family Trees. I had checked for her many times over the years, because we know things always change, and new people start searching on Ancestry. 

I am writing a book about my King family, so I decided to give it one last-ditch effort before putting that chapter to bed. Yes, there was a new one!! Sarah Ann King, the age was about right, living in Montreal, and married to John McTeer.  The person had no parents names for Sarah King, no records attached to the names, just a noted date of marriage, 1881 in Montreal. So I did my own search (which I ALWAYS do anyways) and there it was! 
John McTeer, [locomotove] fireman, son of the late Archibald McTeer of Chaudiere Station and Elizabeth Sutherland his wife, married Sarah Annie King, daughter of the late George King and Elizabeth Nichols his wife.  The witnesses were George King, brother of the bride, and his wife Mary McMillan.
The names had been transcribed as Sarah Annie Rina and John McYeer. Next I went back to the other persons tree to see what else I could learn, and they had one son for this couple, Archibald James (Archie) McTeer, married to Eva Peddle in June 1914. 
Wait!! 1914?

Again they had no records attached, and just that they were married 1914 in Verdun. I clicked on their gallery for Archie and Eva, and.... lo and behold!  There was the same wedding picture my grandmother had in her album! Archie and Eva McTeer! 




I can hear my grandmother saying the name Archie. But I had no idea who he was. I went to the Genealogie Quebec website, tried the Verdun United Church (the one my King family attended), looked at the index of marriages for 1914, and there is was. Leaf twenty-six. 
Archibald James McTeer, brakeman, son of John McTeer and his wife Sarah Ann King and Eva Peddle married June 1914.  Witnesses: Nicholas Peddle, Sarah Myrtle King (my grandmother!!) and Clifford Samuel King (Granny's cousin)
Going year by year through the records at the same church where Archie was baptized I found more children for Sarah Ann King and John McTeer.

Now I have not only solved the mystery of the 1914 photograph, I have added a whole new family to my tree! 

Plus I gave that researcher a Devon family going back almost 300 years. 


Monday, 25 September 2017

The Calico Printer




My 2x great grandfather's sister, Ann Purdie Falconer Tait was a calico printfield worker in Glasgow in 1859 when she married Robert Sinclair, a calico engraver.  





I didn't know much about calico printing so I looked for more information and found the following books and websites on the subject.






The Calico Printers Association was founded in Britain in 1899 with the merge of 46 textile companies and 13 textile merchants. 

The Dictionary of Dyeing and Calico Printing has recipes for making the colours, so I looked up my favourite colour ... green!








Relevant Links












Sunday, 24 September 2017

Canada 150 - The Siege of Quebec






During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.

Today I have for you...



The Siege of Quebec



"Memoirs of the siege of Quebec, capital of all Canada and of the retreat of Monsieur de Bourlemaque, from Carillon to the Isle aux Noix in Lake Champlain : from the journal of a French officer on board the Chezine frigate, taken by His Majesty's ship Rippon, compared with the accounts transmitted home by Major General Wolfe and Vice-Admiral Saunders, with occasional remarks." – 1761


The Battle on the Plains of Abraham took place 13 September 1759, and was a turning point during the Seven Year's War leading to the surrender of Quebec to the British. New France became a British colony with the signing of the Treaty of Paris in 1763. 








And also...




"A Journal of the siege of Quebec: to which is annexed a correct plan of the environs of Quebec and of the battle fought on the 13th September, 1759 : together with a particular detail of the French lines and batteries, and also of the encampments, batteries and attacks of the British army… drawn from the original surveys taken by the engineers of the army: engraved by Thomas Jefferys." - 1760







What is believed to be the first accounting of the battle was published in Boston in 1759, and reprinted a few times.  This is from 1913.




"A Journal of the expedition up the River St. Lawrence : containing a true and most particular account of the transactions of the fleet and army under the command of Admiral Saunders and General Wolfe, from the time of their embarkation at Louisbourg 'til after the surrender of Quebeck" -  1759







The book about The Life of Major-General James Wolfe tells of his battles, including at Cullodon (see index) and the "Heights of Abraham", where both Montcalm and Wolfe died. 

The National Battlefield Commission website, Plains of Abraham, has a database of soldiers who fought there.  There was a Nolin assigned to the Languedoc Regiment... Francois Nolin dit Jolicoeur, who was later granted land in Terrebonne, but the file says he returned to France in 1763.

Will you find one of your ancestors in the database?



Relevant Links

Memoirs of the siege of Quebec 1761

A Journal of the siege of Quebec with maps 1760

Journal of the Expedition up the river St Lawrence - 1759/1913











Friday, 22 September 2017

High Fives - September 22, 2017




High Fives are articles or blog posts I have read during the week that I find interesting, and perhaps are pertinent to my research. Sometimes there are only a couple and sometimes there are quite a few.




First Name Abbreviations
~by Genealogy in Time Magazine
Some of these I didn't know!

~by Donna Moughty at Donna’s Irish Genealogy Resources
Looking for tenant info in owner's estate files. 


~by Patricia Greber at My Genealogy Life
Patricia explains about donating your collections to archives, or museum, etc \
Nice going Patricia!    









For more exciting weekend reading, see what posts these bloggers liked...

Saturday – Gail Dever, Crème de la Crème

Sunday – Randy Seaver, Best of the Genea-Blogs





Wednesday, 20 September 2017

Canada 150 - Report of the Superintendent of Public Instruction







During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.

Today I have for you...



Report of Superintendent of Public Instruction 
for the Province of Quebec






As part of the Sessional Papers of the Province of Quebec, there was printed a Report of the Superintendent of Public Instruction. Many of the reports contain names of teachers, inspectors and even graduates, but not all reports contain the same information.  








Relevant Links 









Monday, 18 September 2017

No Luck of the Irish 4 - Convicts




There have been more publications for Ireland uploaded to Internet Archive. These have to do with returns of convicts and prisoners.

One or two may appear in another of my lists, but this one is more complete.

The return of convicts discharged 1837 has lists by county, with name, offence, sentence and date of discharge.





Some have more information, like this one: locality, name, address, occupation, by whom committed, cause of committal, date of committal, date of commitment, medical report, term of commitment, when term expires.






Relevant Links












Related Posts

No Luck of the Irish,  No Luck of the Irish 2, No Luck of the Irish 3, Irish Constabulary, Education in Ireland

Note:  All Ireland lists of links are on the Resource page and free to download.




Sunday, 17 September 2017

Canada 150 - Prohibition Convention






During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.

Today I have for you...




Prohibition







"Report of proceedings, list of members, societies represented: with a resumé of Report of Commissioners appointed by the Dominion Government 1874, and other evidence in favor of prohibition."


Relevant Links

Dominion Prohibitory Liquor Law Convention, Sept 15th, 16th, 17th 1875





Friday, 15 September 2017

High Fives - September 15, 2017



My High Fives are blog posts or articles that I read during the week and that I find interesting. Sometimes there are only a couple and sometimes there are quite a few.




~by John at John Grenham – Irish Roots
Some 40,000 Canadians also fought in the Civil War. There is a website with lists of names, but turn on pop-up blocker there is a pop-up ad. 


~by Elaine Macintyre at National Museums Scotland
I wonder if the cast had a glance at the ring of Charlie made by my ancestor's brother? 


~by Lynn Palermo at The Armchair Genealogist
I wish someone had told ME this when I started – now I have to find time to do it! I have a sort-of system, but it needs a lot of fine tuning.


~by Candice McDonald at Finding your Canadian Story
Good find Candice! They are an interesting read even if you don't have prisoner ancestors. 


~by Itamar Eichner at YNet News
There have been other document transfers, but this one is deemed to have more significant content for Holocaust descendants.


Plans to relocate abandoned York cemetery begins with search for descendants
~by Mark Roper at Fox 43 News 
That's the way to do it.  Calling all descendants of those buried here (York, PA) 






For more exciting weekend reading...


Saturday – Gail Dever, Crème de la Crème


Sunday – Randy Seaver, Best of the Genea-Blogs




Wednesday, 13 September 2017

Canada 150 - The Richelieu & Ontario Navigation Co






During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.

Today I have for you...




The Richelieu and Ontario Navigation Co 





"In 1857 the Royal Mail Line became the Canadian Navigation Company. This joined with others in 1875 to form the Richelieu and Ontario Navigation Company. With Sir Hugh Allan of Montreal as Chairman, the R&0 was pre-eminent along the 800-mile route from Toronto to the Saguenay. The R&0 prospered as such until 1913, when it absorbed four competitors and a number of subsidiaries to become the Canada Steamship Lines (CSL) group."





Relevant Links










Monday, 11 September 2017

From Hatter to Coremaker




I had found my great grandfather's brother on the 1921 Canada census for Montreal saying he was a hat maker. Wow, what an interesting trade!  I even found George King, owner of King Hat Company in the City Directory for Montreal. So I looked up everything I could on hatters and hat bleaching. 





Wrong!  I hadn't done much research on him as I have been busy with my direct lines. Yesterday I thought with all this info I have on hatters I can write a post, so I started delving more into his life. I hadn't found the 1881 census so I checked at LAC and there was George King, hat bleacher, 15 years older than my George and married to someone else. Not my George!  


I did my due diligence and discovered that my George H King was a coremaker for the Grand Trunk Railroad, making molds for the wheels. I did find out from a cousin that George, at the age of 12, delivered the very first edition of the Montreal Star in his neighbourhood. 

Oh well, you live and learn and hopefully pay better attention the next time. 
Here is the information I gathered on hatters and milliners, hats, caps and bonnets.



Relevant Links




















Sunday, 10 September 2017

Canada 150 - Nova Scotia Yacht Clubs






During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.

Today I have for you...



Royal Nova Scotia Yacht Squadron

1896 Report


"The objectives of the Royal Nova Scotia Yacht Squadron are to promote yacht building and sailing in the province, and to encourage its members to become proficient in navigation, in the personal management, control and handling of their yachts, and in all other matters pertaining to seamanship."





Relevant Links

Reports of Royal Nova Scotia Yacht Squadron, Halifax

Royal Nova Scotia Yacht Squadron History - Website

Royal Cape Breton Yacht Club 




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