Wednesday, 29 November 2017

Canada 150 - Ontario Institutes for Deaf, Mute and Blind






During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.





Today I have for you...


Ontario Institute for the Deaf and Dumb


1906 Convention of Graduates


In June of 1906 a Convention of Graduates was held at the Ontario Institute for the Deaf and Dumb. Many former pupils attended and a list of names, where they were from and their current occupation, was published in the Ontario Sessional Papers for 1907 by the Department of Education.




The Education minister's report on the Institute for the Deaf starts on page 411 and you can see names of staff and teachers, courses taught, etc. There are portraits of four students who won medals. 

There are also names of students registered for 1906, and those that took examinations in Articulation classes, with their age and their marks. See links below.



Ontario Institute for the Blind

In the same Sessional Papers is a report on the Institute for the Education of the Blind which starts on page 330



Scrolling through you will see names of students registered, names of students who passed their exams successfully and names of teachers and staff.





Relevant Links



Monday, 27 November 2017

Look in more than one city newspaper for news



My 2x great grandfatherJohn Seale died in Kingston, Ontario in 3 April 1892. I found a small notice in the Kingston paper, as expected, which gave the date of death, his age and funeral arrangements.


SEALE- In Pittsburgh, April 3rd, John Seale aged 84 years.The funeral will take place on Wednesday morning at ten o'clock from his late residence, Front Road, to Cataraqui cemetery.  Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend. 

It's neither here nor there, but he was actually 85.

I decided to take a look at other city papers and found this item in a Toronto newspaper, not under the BMD notices, but under Kingston News.. notes. This one gives us a bit more insight into the character of John. 



  
   
My great grand aunt's husband was a locomotive engineer, and when he died in August 1914 his burial record said he died in a railway accident. All I know was that he was living around Chaudiere Station, Quebec City at the time.  So I went to Google Newspaper Archives and went through all the newspapers from around Quebec City that had available issues for that date.  I finally found the story that he died in the Quebec Daily Telegraph, which led me to find the story of the accident in L'Action Sociale.


Sometimes you find a local newspaper for that time, but it is mostly unreadable, like this issue from April 1916 when my grandfather's brother, Alex Mavor, died in WWI.




Several newspapers published casualty lists and I found Alex's name in the Winnipeg newspaper.  





So if you don't find an article or notice that you're looking for locally, try another city's newspaper. 




Sunday, 26 November 2017

Canada 150 - Saskatchewan Settlers and Soldiers






During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.





Today I have for you...


Settlements in Saskatchewan





Names of settlers of Saskatchewan in the late 1800s ...








...and names of soldiers who fought at Duck Lake in 1885






Relevant Links




Detailed report upon all claims to land and right to participate in the North-West Half-Breed Grant by settlers along the South Saskatchewan and vicinity, west of Range 26, W. 2nd Meridian, being the settlements commonly known as St. Louis de Langevin, St. Laurent or Batoche, and Duck Lake – 1886...



(Rapport détaillé sur toutes les demandes de terrains : et du droit de participer aux concessions de terres faites aux Métis du Nord-Ouest : présentées par les colons établis sur la Saskatchewan-Sud et dans les environs à l'ouest du rang 26, à l'ouest du 2e méridien : ces établissements étant ceux généralement connus sous les noms de Saint-Louis de Langevin, Saint-Laurent ou Batoche, et Lac-aux-Canards)








Friday, 24 November 2017

High Fives - November 24, 2017




High Fives are articles or blog posts I have read during the week that I find interesting, and perhaps are pertinent to my research. Sometimes there are only a couple and sometimes there are quite a few.





~by Valmay at Families in British India Society
If you have British ancestors that went back and forth to India, this is a good site for research. They have added more to their database of arrival and departure notices from the newspapers.


~by Marian B. Wood at Climbing my Family Tree
Marian discusses new operators for searching with google.


~by Gail Dever at Genealogy à la carte
A chance for Canadian genealogists to have input for the next census. Use the maximum number of words in the comments to make your case. 


~by Yvonne Seale, Making Women Matter, One Medieval Manuscript at a Time
Yvonne talks turkey. 


~by Donna Moughty at Donna’s Irish Genealogy Resources
Knowing your family medical history can save a life!







For more exciting weekend reading, see what posts these bloggers liked...

Saturday – Gail Dever, Crème de la Crème

Sunday – Randy Seaver, Best of the Genea-Blogs

Wednesday, 22 November 2017

Canada 150 - Kingston and the Loyalists






During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.



Today I have for you...


Kingston (NB) and the Loyalists of the "Spring Fleet" of 1783




"With reminiscenses of early days in Connecticut… A narrative to which is appended a diary written by Sarah Frost on her voyage to St. John, N.B., with the Loyalists of 1783"


Includes a nominal cadastre of the original grants of Kingston, New Brunswick and a return of the families with names and former place of abode.





Relevant Links






Wednesday, 15 November 2017

Canada 150 - Fire in Three Rivers 1856





During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.

Today I have for you...




The 1856 Fire in Three Rivers / Trois-Rivieres





Proceedings of a public meeting of the citizens of Three Rivers to discuss the calamitous fire that occurred November 15th, 1856. 
\




With list including name of property owner affected, amount of loss, occupation of tenant, etc. 





Relevant Links

Sunday, 12 November 2017

Canada 150 - War Time Trade Board - Price Fixing






During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.

Today I have for you...




Report of The Wartime Prices and Trade Board 





The War Time Prices and Food Board was established at the beginning of the war, in 1939 to regulate not only the prices of food, but what food would be exported and what is kept at home for domestic use. The government publication explains how they chose which products to provide subsidies to keep the price low for the average consumer, and fixed maximum prices for others. I am using the following examples from the 1943 Report.





Rules were added, amended and revoked throughout the war, as were war taxes and duties on products. 

Besides food and other trade products, the Board had control over many services, such as plumbing, dressmaking, undertaking, harbour services, etc.. In 1941 all real property other than farm land was under the control of a board, including restaurants and room rentals. 





There is a Directory of Officials for the governing board and for the associated companies and local offices.





Relevant Links

Report of The Wartime Prices and Trade Board 1939-1946 w/ directory of officials

War Time Food Production Posters




Note:  The US had the War Industries Board. In Australia price fixing came under the War Precautions Act.



Friday, 10 November 2017

On the Road






We will be on the road for the next week. 





There will be no High Five post today or next Friday. I did schedule some Canada 150 posts and My Military Ancestor posts at my Challenges blog.

I'll be back!!

Dianne



Wednesday, 8 November 2017

Canada 150 - Long Point Settlement






During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.

Today I have for you...




Long Point Settlement, Norfolk Ontario






Settlers from Europe began arriving in this hamlet on the northern shores of Lake Erie around 1790. Loyalists began settling here after the American Revolution. 

There are genealogies and portraits of first settlers.




The Woodhouse Wesleyan Methodist Church (now a United Church) was built about 1800.






Relevant Links




Monday, 6 November 2017

Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen




I have quite a few railroad ancestors on my tree. Some were engineers, and a new-found husband of an ancestor was a locomotive fireman before later becoming an engineer. 

When John McTeer married Sarah Anne King, my grandmother's aunt, he was a locomotive fireman from Chaudiere Station, Quebec City, now working in Montreal for the Grand Trunk Railroad. 






In 1884 John McTeer was secretary for the Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen at the Montreal lodge. 




Sometime in 1888 John moved to Bisbee Arizona and became a locomotive engineer for the Arizona and South Eastern Railroad. 





In 1902 John McTeer moved back to Canada, at Limoilou, Quebec City, and was working for the Quebec & Lake St John Railway (owned by Canadian Northern). On 10 August 1914 John's train came to a bridge that he discovered too late was afire. The engine fell through, killing the fireman and injuring John. He died in hospital four days later.




I found in the 1914 issue of the Brotherhood magazine a Statement of Death and Disability Claims. (No mention of John McTeer though). There are more on the previous page with amounts of insurance.






In the UK it is the Associated Society of Locomotive Engineers and Firemen.



Relevant Links

Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen's Magazine










Sunday, 5 November 2017

Canada 150 - Manitoba Historical and Scientific Society






During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.

Today I have for you...



Manitoba Historical and Scientific Society





Reports of the Manitoba Historical and Scientific Society, Winnipeg was created in 1879. The annual reports hold lists of members.  Not all members live in Winnipeg, there is one who lived near my great-grandfather on Bagot Street in Kingston, Ontario.



Members are from all across Canada, with some in the US and other parts of the world.  









By joining our Facebook group you get other genealogy news from time to time, and you can download pages of links that go with the posts. Use follow buttons at top right under search bar.


Copyright © Genealogy: Beyond the BMD
Division of Dianne at Home