Friday, 31 March 2017

My High Fives - March 31, 2017




Written in the inside covers
~by Judy G Russell at The Legal Genealogist
In Canada it was the Encyclopedia Britannica and we also were told to "go look it up". As young kids we used them to make roads for our cars (I had 2 brothers) but during my school years I used them often for homework.
I have come across notations not only on the inside covers, but in the page margins of books and recipe books. I have also seen notations in the margins of church records. In some instances beside the baptism record of a girl was noted the day of her marriage.


Did Victorians Really get Brain Fever?
~by Audrey C. Peterson at Jstor Daily
We must realize that in our ancestors' time they did not have names for many diseases that we recognize now. Even today many people have symptoms that the doctors don't know what the illness is.  The heart condition that runs in my family was only recognized and named in 1958, though many of my ancestors likely died from it.


Calgary in 1889
~by Gail Dever at Genealogy à la carte
Calgary was a late bloomer – it was not very big when my brother moved there in the 70s (about 400,000) and I loved all the green spaces in and around the city. But when I lived there in the 90s it had started to sprawl and the population had more than doubled. According to the census of 2016 the city population has now tripled to over 1,239,000.  





Wednesday, 29 March 2017

Canada 150 - Shareholders of Chartered Banks of Canada





During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.

Today I have for you...


Shareholders of Chartered Banks of the Dominion of Canada




Under each bank is listed the shareholders, with city of residence, number of shares, and amount paid. There may also be estate accounts, which are held until probate is finished and the money can be distributed to the heirs.





When it states a person is trustee for another person, it is probably until the person reaches a certain age.  When it states a person is trustee usufructuary, that means the trustee can use the produce or income from property or asset for a specified time.




The oldest bank in Canada, with bank number 001, is the Bank of Montreal, which opened for business 3 November 1817. Until the Bank of Canada was established in 1934 banks issued their own bank notes. There is a list of early banks here, some of which closed in a few years or may have been taken over by another bank.



Relevant Links


Shareholders in the Chartered Banks of the Dominion of Canada 1875-1895

Shareholders in the Chartered Banks of the Dominion of Canada 1900-1915 (1902 wrong)

Monday, 27 March 2017

Press Associations and Journalists



We all know that newspapers can be a great source for stories about our ancestors.
What about the owners of the newspapers?  The editors and journalists? Do you have an ancestor that worked at a newspaper?

The objectives of the press associations were to promote the general interests of the journalistic profession and to improve the quality of journalism. Members were journalists from different respected newspapers across the country, province or state. 






The booklets of meetings of the associations have lists of members. 





Some of the following publications have portraits also. 
Check local libraries for more. 



Relevant Links





















Sunday, 26 March 2017

Canada 150 - Ecole de Medecine / Montreal School of Medicine and Surgery





During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.

Today I have for you...


École de médecine et de chirurgie de Montréal




The Montreal School of Medicine and Surgery. These circulars are in French and have names of students, and where they are from.





Relevant Links


Ecole de medecine et de chirurgie de Montreal, various 1858-1895 w/list of students
(Montreal School of Medicine and Surgery)



Friday, 24 March 2017

My High Fives - March 24, 2017






The Story of the Quaich
~by Karen and Debbie at Culloden Battlefield
My 6x great grandfather, goldsmith of Edinburgh, made a quaich of silver with initials on the handles, making me think it was for a wedding ceremony. Could the RT stand for a Tait I have not discovered yet?  It was interesting learning about the quaich. 


Railway Accident Records
~by Rebecca Murray at Library Archives Canada Blog
The small town I grew up in was in shocked after a bus carrying students of the town to a dance was hit by a train and 19 kids were killed.
Railway Accident returns can also be found in some Sessional Papers.


When Cricket Reigned Supreme in Glasgow
~by Robert MacLean at University of Glasgow Library
My grandfather had a cricket bat. I wonder if any of my Scottish ancestors played cricket? I'll have to see if I can watch a game on TV sometime.


Let's Get Unstuck! Time to Remove Photos From Sticky Album Pages
~by Diane L Richard at Upfront with NGS
Guilty! I have a few albums with magnetic pages.  Now, where can I find how to rescue photos that were glued onto the black pages of old albums? Seems to be I saw a blog post on that a while back.


Quiz: Are you an Irish Genealogy Expert?
~by Niall Cullen at Find My Past Blog
Okay, the cat's out of the bag. I am NOT an expert on Irish Genealogy.  Are you?



Wednesday, 22 March 2017

Canada 150 - The Story of Dundas





During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.

Today I have for you...


The Story of Dundas



Includes notes on and portraits of early settlers..






Relevant Links





Sunday, 19 March 2017

Canada 150 - The Dominion Annual Register and Review






During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.

Today I have for you...





The contents are not the same for every issue...



Some have a Journal of Remarkable Occurrences





And this one tells how the vote went for Temperance in different cities...




Relevant Links

The Dominion Annual Register and Review



Friday, 17 March 2017

My High Fives - March 17, 2017






A Tale of Two Halves; Historical Revival for Gordon Castle Highland Games
~by Historic Houses Association - as part of Scotland's Year of History
My Mavor ancestors are a sept of Clan Gordon and I see we can book a stay at the castle!

~by Mary Sutherland at Genealogy Ensemble
My Irish ancestor carried the banner for William at the Battle of the Boyne so they probably celebrated the Twelfth as well.  My cousins' Irish ancestors were Catholic and their grandfather was the Grand Marshall for the parade in Montreal for three years running in the early 1920s.


That's all I have for this time.



Wednesday, 15 March 2017

Canada 150 - Story of Manitoba





During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.

Today I have for you...


The Story of Manitoba



A Manitoba timeline and biographies and portraits of leading men. 




Story of Manitoba Vol 1 has a few of our Nolin family mentioned among those who helped shape the province. 





Relevant Links









Monday, 13 March 2017

Chartered Accountants



Even though I am pretty good with numbers and could do the income tax for my parents' business, I could never figure out accounting. My grandmother's sister was a trained bookkeeper and she kept their books for them.




Like many trades and practices, accountants the world over have formed societies or institutes to develop standards for the profession.





Do you have an accountant among your ancestors?



Relevant Links

Year-book of the Institute of Accountants in the United States of America, 1915

Year-book of the Institute of Accountants in the United States of America, 1917

Year-book of the Institute of Accountants in the United States of America, 1919

Institute of Chartered Accounts of England and Wales, 1904

Society of Accountants and Auditors, Uk 1899

Annual roster of registered certified public accountants of Montana, 1953

Report of the Board of Registration of certified public accountants, Mass. 1924

National Association of Cost Accountants Year Book, various years, NY

Canadian chartered accountants;1911-1973- 3 Vols

Institute of Chartered Accountants Ontario, w/list of members, 1896

Institute of Chartered accountants of Saskatchewan, w/list of members, 1913

List of members/ Institute of Chartered Accountants in Australia (library)

* Accountants in the First World War (pdf)  (*added 5 Apr 2017)





Sunday, 12 March 2017

Canada 150 - Curling in Canada





During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.

Today I have for you...


Curling in Canada



The game of curling originated in medieval Scotland.
The Tim Horton's Men's Brier final is today (March 12, 2017) in St. John's NL. If you enjoy curling here is the schedule for upcoming championships.

In 1902-1903 the Scottish Curling Team came to Canada and have been playing against each other every five years since, alternately in Scotland and in Canada. In 1912-13 it was Canada's turn to host.



Check for other curling club publications at your local library.

I imagine you have seen the segment on CBC about the new game everyone is talking about..


Canadians do love their winter sports, and this cross between curling and crockinole looks like fun, eh?


Relevant Links



Curling Clubs Canada (Ottawa, Montreal, Three Rivers, and more...)




List of Curlers from Canada




Friday, 10 March 2017

My High Fives - March 10, 2017






~by Karen and Debbie at Culloden Battlefield 
My ancestor’s brother was a Jacobite and he got out of Dodge Culloden by the skin of his teeth! I wonder if he left anything behind on the battlefield?

~by Yvette at Dutch Genealogy
I was married twice but not on the dame day!?! More like 26 years apart haha! 
An aunt was from Holland, my Dad spent time there during the war, and I find the customs fascinating. Thank you Yvette!

~by Donna Moughty at Donna’s Irish Genealogy Resources 
Terrific info on ways to find where your Irish ancestor originated from. 

~at Library and Archives Canada 
I love maps, trying to find exactly where my ancestors lived, but never thought of the person who made the maps, or how and why he made them – I will never look at an old map the same again!

~by Diane L Richard at Upfront with NGS
Hmmmmm… good question! 
The subject of no baptism records is touched on by J. Dennis Willigan, Katherine A. Lynch in their 1982 book “Sources and Methods of Historical Demography: Studies in Social Discontinuity” which can be viewed here – pg 68-70





How to Use Internet Archive on Flickr




You know you can search books and publications by author, creator, title or subject on Internet Archive.  Did you know you can search by image?
And all images are free to use!

Internet Archive has uploaded all the images from its books onto Flickr. Here is how you do a search by image:

Go to Internet Archive Book Images at Flickr

Fig.1


If you use the search box at the top of the page, that will search ALL of Flickr for images, including personal ones and ones that may be copyright.
Instead, look Under the header photo, there is a menu bar with Photostream, Albums, Favorites, Groups then across to the others side, More.  IGNORE all that, Internet Archive did not create any albums or groups etc.  Under More you see a search magnifying glass, that is what you want. Click on the magnifying glass (Fig.1).

Now you will see at the TOP search box, it has changed to searching in the Internet Archive group of photos. (Fig.2) I type in skating (first thing I thought of since where my kids live they are in the deep freeze again in this year's never ending winter), and you see it gives me images from books having to do with skating, including some photos of hockey teams!

Fig 2


Not all images will be relevant, but you may find they do mention skating somewhere in that book.  If you leave the cursor in the search box and hit Enter again, the photos will change somewhat. You can also scroll down.
When you find an image that suits your purpose or interest, click on the photo (I picked the hockey dudes in stripes). There you will see what book the image is from, when the image was taken, any copyright restrictions, how many views it's had, and other info.

To find out more about this image, you have other choices...
View book page: Book Viewer
About this book: catalogue entry
View all images: all images from [this] book.
OR
Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.
Choose View the book page or view book online, then switch from single page view to two page view, bottom right. (Fig.3)  This makes it like a flip book.

Fig.3

You can also choose to see multiple pages if you like.
Most books at internet archive are searchable by typing your keyword in the search box, top right. Since this is a book about skating, I wouldn't put skating as my keyword I'll get a million hits!  Instead I can search the name of a city or town, or a surname if I think an ancestor played hockey or skated professionally.
You can use the upper left back arrow to go back to the search.

Experiment with different keywords... try town names, occupations, business names, different sports or games, animals or objects (search woman dress and see what you get!)

Similarly if you use Flickr Commons, don't use the top search box, but scroll down to the search box that says Search the Commons and click the blue search button. This will take you to photos on the internet that have no copyright restrictions. These may contain some personal images that the owner has labeled for reuse.

For either platform it is not necessary to sign up to Flickr to view or download images, but you get other features, like uploading your images and marking images as your favourites, if you sign up. Even though it is a Yahoo login I signed up for my account with my hotmail email (which I use for all things internet).



Fig.4


To download an image use the down arrow and you can choose the size you want (Fig.4). The Star puts the image in your favourites and the share arrow lets you share on social media or embed in a webpage.


Relevant Links

Internet Archive Book Images at Flickr

Flickr Commons


*I thank my fellow blogger Gail for suggesting I write this post.




Wednesday, 8 March 2017

Canada 150 - International Women's Day





During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.

Today I have for you...


Women of Canada



These are the strong independent women who came before me and made me who I am...




My 3x great grandmother Mary Johnston who was born in Armagh, Ireland in 1819, married William Johnston and immigrated to Canada. 
My 2x great grandmother Susanna Johnston born in South Durham, Quebec in 1846 and married John Porter.
My great grandmother Mary Jane Porter born in Ulverton, Quebec in 1867 and married Clement King.
My grandmother Sarah Myrtle King born in 1894 in Montreal and married Herbert James Mavor.
My Mother Jean Audrey Mavor born in 1925 in Verdun and married Thomas Ray Edward Seale.


How do you honour your female line of amazing women?


Relevant Links

Women of Canada, their life and work, 1900

Les Femmes du Canada: leur vie et leurs oeuvres, 1900

The National Council of Women of Canada: What it means and what it does, 1900

Year books - National Council of Women of Canada

Regulations of the Society for the Protection of Women and Children, 1918

Reception and protection of female immigrants in Canada 1879

Industrial House of Refuge for females, Toronto 1855

Annual report of the Toronto Magdalen Asylum, or Female House of Refuge 1862

Types of Canadian women and of women who are or have been connected with Canada, 1903 (biographies and portraits)




Related Post: International Women's Day 2016




Monday, 6 March 2017

Education in Ireland




Trinity College Dublin (University of Dublin) was founded in 1592 as a protestant college. Catholics could ask for permission from their church to attend in 1793. Women were admitted as full members in 1904.




Queen's Colleges at Belfast, Cork and Galway were established in 1845. The names soon changed to Queen's University of Ireland at Cork, Belfast and Galway and were for both catholic and presbyterian students.





The Royal University of Ireland was successor to the Queen's University of Ireland, dissolved in 1882. After the 1880 reforms the catholic colleges came under the Catholic University. The 1908 reforms created the National University of Ireland and a separate Queen's University of Belfast.





Did your Irish ancestor attend one of these colleges?


Relevant links

Names of Matriculated Students who entered Queen's Colleges in Ireland, 1849-60

Report of President of Queen's College Cork, various years

Report of President of Queen's College Belfast, various years

Report of President of Queen's College Galway, various years

Royal University of Ireland - report and list of successful candidates for degrees

Catholic University of Ireland, C1857

National University of Ireland, 1910

Calendar: Trinity College, Dublin

The Dublin University Calendar

Reports of the Inspector of Reformatory Schools of Ireland (only staff names)

Number of Pupils on Rolls, Managers, Teachers and Workmistresses in Irish National Schools 1857-58; Names of Officers and Commissioners

Return of names of Commissioners of National Education in Ireland 1884

Return giving names, appointment and attendances, 1890-1900, of the Commissioners of National Education in Ireland

Return of Names of Fellows and Examiners of Royal University of Ireland, 1881

Names of President, Vice-President and Professors of Queen's Colleges at Cork, Galway and Belfast, 1865





Sunday, 5 March 2017

Canada 150 - Short-Horn Cattle Imported to Canada





During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.

Today I have for you...


The Dominion Short-Horn Breeder's Association



The front of this publication has the list of officers of the Short-Horn Breeder's Association. It goes on to show records of which Canadian breeders bought what cattle from whom and where and what the pedigree is. 



Also names of people in the UK and US who sold to or bought from the breeders in Canada.



Relevant Links







Friday, 3 March 2017

My High Fives - Intro




When I read other bloggers' lists of favourite posts of the week, I sometimes wonder ... Hey!! What about this one, or that one??  Truth is we probably don’t even have the same reading list! Not everyone has the same criteria for choosing which blogs to read. I talked about this the other day in the post Making a Blog List.

So I decided I would make my own list once a week of blog posts or articles that spoke to me particularly. Doing this makes it easy for me to refer back to these posts, and perhaps gives readers a chance to discover other blogs.


These are my High Fives -  March 3, 2017


Best Place for Genealogy Tourism in France? Montbeliard!
~by Anne Morddel at The French Genealogy Blog
Enlightening! I never thought of Mennonites and Protestants as living in France.

Bridge Inn, 1 Maudland Rd
~by Steve Halliwell at Preston's Inns, Taverns and Beerhouses
I just found this blog this week and I intend to follow it more closely. I have Singletons in the Preston area and one of them went to Liverpool to run a pub. I believe he must have had some previous experience?

Dutch term - Pieremagoggel
~by Yvette Hoitink at Dutch Genealogy
This made me smile and reminds me of the annual Silly Boat Regatta in Nanaimo

Century Property Owner's Certificates Mississiquoi
~Mississquoi Genealogy
A branch of my ancestor's family lived in this area

The Elusive Potters of Goulbourne
~by Patricia Greber at My Genealogy Life
I too have female ancestors whose families elude me.




Thursday, 2 March 2017

Canada 150 - History of PEI and Censuses





During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.

Today I have for you...


History of PEI


... included is the nominal census for 1798.


Also a book about the French Régime which talks about the census of 1752.




And one about the Scottish Catholic Immigrants, with a list of Scottish Priests.







Relevant Link

Wednesday, 1 March 2017

Making a Blog List - Where do you Start?




There are so many genealogy bloggers now, and more getting on board every day. The list gets overwhelming and it is just not possible to read all the posts out there.  One nice thing is that not everyone I follow posts on the same day!

So how do you choose which blogs to follow?





First think of what you want from a blog.
There are different types of blogs, and I like a good mix of some that ...

  • teach searching techniques
  • give genealogy news 
  • tell family ancestor stories
  • are historical, perhaps about a specific topic, like WWI for example 

You may want to read authors that write about their ancestors that are from the same area as yours, getting an idea of resources available. Or blogs of ancestor stories with the same surname as yours. Perhaps you read a blog because you like their style and the subjects interest you.  Or you read the blog of a friend because.... well, it's your friend!

Here, the Geneablogger website is your friend.
There are over 3000 genealogy blogs registered on the Genealogy Blog Roll. By clicking on the little arrows beside the Blog/Type headings you can sort A-Z or Z-A. You can also do a quick search right there. I type Jones in the search box and get 4 blogs pertaining to Jones. Type in Education and you get 259 entries. Unfortunately there are many titles and descriptions that give no clue, but fortunately there is another option.  If nothing turns up here, click on Search Blogs on the menu bar and you get a more thorough search of genealogy blogs on the internet. I type Tozer in this search box and I get six short pages of results and I can pretty much tell from the snippet whether or not they are my Tozers.

Try to keep your list manageable. Take the time to leave a comment on the posts you enjoy. Most authors like getting reader comments and will take the time to reply.

How do YOU choose which blogs to read?