Wednesday, 20 September 2017

Canada 150 - Report of the Superintendent of Public Instruction







During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.

Today I have for you...



Report of Superintendent of Public Instruction 
for the Province of Quebec






As part of the Sessional Papers of the Province of Quebec, there was printed a Report of the Superintendent of Public Instruction. Many of the reports contain names of teachers, inspectors and even graduates, but not all reports contain the same information.  








Relevant Links 









Monday, 18 September 2017

No Luck of the Irish 4 - Convicts




There have been more publications for Ireland uploaded to Internet Archive. These have to do with returns of convicts and prisoners.

One or two may appear in another of my lists, but this one is more complete.

The return of convicts discharged 1837 has lists by county, with name, offence, sentence and date of discharge.





Some have more information, like this one: locality, name, address, occupation, by whom committed, cause of committal, date of committal, date of commitment, medical report, term of commitment, when term expires.






Relevant Links












Related Posts

No Luck of the Irish,  No Luck of the Irish 2, No Luck of the Irish 3, Irish Constabulary, Education in Ireland

Note:  All Ireland lists of links are on the Resource page and free to download.




Sunday, 17 September 2017

Canada 150 - Prohibition Convention






During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.

Today I have for you...




Prohibition







"Report of proceedings, list of members, societies represented: with a resumé of Report of Commissioners appointed by the Dominion Government 1874, and other evidence in favor of prohibition."


Relevant Links

Dominion Prohibitory Liquor Law Convention, Sept 15th, 16th, 17th 1875





Friday, 15 September 2017

High Fives - September 15, 2017



My High Fives are blog posts or articles that I read during the week and that I find interesting. Sometimes there are only a couple and sometimes there are quite a few.




~by John at John Grenham – Irish Roots
Some 40,000 Canadians also fought in the Civil War. There is a website with lists of names, but turn on pop-up blocker there is a pop-up ad. 


~by Elaine Macintyre at National Museums Scotland
I wonder if the cast had a glance at the ring of Charlie made by my ancestor's brother? 


~by Lynn Palermo at The Armchair Genealogist
I wish someone had told ME this when I started – now I have to find time to do it! I have a sort-of system, but it needs a lot of fine tuning.


~by Candice McDonald at Finding your Canadian Story
Good find Candice! They are an interesting read even if you don't have prisoner ancestors. 


~by Itamar Eichner at YNet News
There have been other document transfers, but this one is deemed to have more significant content for Holocaust descendants.


Plans to relocate abandoned York cemetery begins with search for descendants
~by Mark Roper at Fox 43 News 
That's the way to do it.  Calling all descendants of those buried here (York, PA) 






For more exciting weekend reading...


Saturday – Gail Dever, Crème de la Crème


Sunday – Randy Seaver, Best of the Genea-Blogs




Wednesday, 13 September 2017

Canada 150 - The Richelieu & Ontario Navigation Co






During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.

Today I have for you...




The Richelieu and Ontario Navigation Co 





"In 1857 the Royal Mail Line became the Canadian Navigation Company. This joined with others in 1875 to form the Richelieu and Ontario Navigation Company. With Sir Hugh Allan of Montreal as Chairman, the R&0 was pre-eminent along the 800-mile route from Toronto to the Saguenay. The R&0 prospered as such until 1913, when it absorbed four competitors and a number of subsidiaries to become the Canada Steamship Lines (CSL) group."





Relevant Links










Monday, 11 September 2017

From Hatter to Coremaker




I had found my great grandfather's brother on the 1921 Canada census for Montreal saying he was a hat maker. Wow, what an interesting trade!  I even found George King, owner of King Hat Company in the City Directory for Montreal. So I looked up everything I could on hatters and hat bleaching. 





Wrong!  I hadn't done much research on him as I have been busy with my direct lines. Yesterday I thought with all this info I have on hatters I can write a post, so I started delving more into his life. I hadn't found the 1881 census so I checked at LAC and there was George King, hat bleacher, 15 years older than my George and married to someone else. Not my George!  


I did my due diligence and discovered that my George H King was a coremaker for the Grand Trunk Railroad, making molds for the wheels. I did find out from a cousin that George, at the age of 12, delivered the very first edition of the Montreal Star in his neighbourhood. 

Oh well, you live and learn and hopefully pay better attention the next time. 
Here is the information I gathered on hatters and milliners, hats, caps and bonnets.



Relevant Links




















Sunday, 10 September 2017

Canada 150 - Nova Scotia Yacht Clubs






During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.

Today I have for you...



Royal Nova Scotia Yacht Squadron

1896 Report


"The objectives of the Royal Nova Scotia Yacht Squadron are to promote yacht building and sailing in the province, and to encourage its members to become proficient in navigation, in the personal management, control and handling of their yachts, and in all other matters pertaining to seamanship."





Relevant Links

Reports of Royal Nova Scotia Yacht Squadron, Halifax

Royal Nova Scotia Yacht Squadron History - Website

Royal Cape Breton Yacht Club 




Friday, 8 September 2017

High Fives - September 8, 2017




My High Fives are articles or blog posts that I read during the week and that I find interesting. Sometimes there are only a couple and sometimes there are quite a few.



~by Anne Morddel at The French Genealogy Blog
I didn't know that!


~by Melanie Mayo at Family History Daily
Good advice, and read the comments too. 


~by Judy G Russell at The Legal Genealogist
As Judy says, check local societies, archives and libraries for possible records.


~by Lyndal Simmonds at Thornetree Genealogy
Join Lyndal as she discovers the meaning of an object left to her by her grandfather.





  

Thursday, 7 September 2017

Grandparents Day Challenge




National Grandparents Day is celebrated at different times of year depending on the country. In Canada and the US it is this coming Sunday, September 10th.





No matter when or where it is celebrated, I love any opportunity to celebrate my grandparents. I always loved to sit at my grandmothers side while she told me stories about her childhood, her parents and her grandparents. 


CHALLENGE:

Tell a story as told to you by one of your grandparents!


Write your story on your blog and comment about it here below. 
If you don't have a blog, post it here in the comments or in the comments on our Facebook group page.

I look forward to reading your stories!




Wednesday, 6 September 2017

Canada 150 - Grosse Isle






During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.

Today I have for you...



Grosse Ile Hospital




At Library and Archives Canada in RG7 G18 section is found MIKAN 126292, which is a set of  nineteen images pertaining to Grosse Ile Hospital, including a nominal list of persons who died in the Grosse Isle Hospital on or after May 1, 1834. Info taken in these records are: name, age, from what vessel, from what port, date of admission, date of death, disease, and how property was disposed of.





Relevant Links


Nominal list of persons who died in the Grosse Isle Hospital

Images of Grosse Ile at BAnQ







Monday, 4 September 2017

The Calendar Makes a Difference




A thing to consider when entering dates for the vital records of your ancestors is which calendar is in use at the time.  In Britain and it's colonies before 1752 the Julian calendar was used, and the legal new year began on March 25th.  That is why in old English records the heading date is before March 25th.





In the early records of the 1500s perhaps you will see the word year and the month names written in Latin, and the days are written in Roman Numerals.  When the numeral is just 1 or ends in a 1, they may use a j. So one will be j and eighteen will be xviij.  In the above record the first baptism for the year 1566 was in May (last of previous year being in January) and the last baptism for 1566 was xxij Martius, or the 22nd of March. The following year has it's first baptism in April, since the New Year began March 25th.

The Gregorian calendar was adopted in the British Empire in Sept 1752, and during transition often dual dates could have been used.



Roman Calendar


In a post I did for New Year's Day in 2014, I wrote about the Julian Calendar and referred to a publication with the Roman Calendar, giving the months and days in Latin. It doesn't matter that the book is in French, you will understand from the Latin what the words for the months and days are.

Stephen P Morse of San Francisco has provided an easy online program which converts Julian to Gregorian and v.v.




Enter the date (before September 1752) in the Julian Calendar, make sure the New Year is set at March 25 for Britain. Next under Country, choose your ancestors country from the drop down menu. It will give you the last day the Julian Calendar was used and the official first day the Gregorian Calendar was used. Like I said, in some cases there can be overlap, or show dual dates.  Stephen has other calendar converters (eg Jewish, Mayan, etc), foreign letters and characters, plus other genealogy information on his website... click "My Other Webpages" to check it out. 




Relevant Links

Julian Calendar with Latin months

Calendar Converter, by Steven Morse

Roman Numerals

British Empire and Overseas Territories






Sunday, 3 September 2017

Canada 150 - Back to School





During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.

Today I have for you...



Back to School

The School Magazine, 1915




Although the magazine is published in Toronto, it is a magazine about education in all of Canada. There are names throughout.

I have listed some school calendars below. To find more, go to archive.org and use keywords: school, college, university, etc. To look in a specific place add AND with name of the place. Eg:  school AND kingston. Also look in local library.



Relevant Links













Friday, 1 September 2017

High Fives - September 1, 2017



High Fives are articles or blog posts that I read during the week and that I find interesting. Sometimes there are only a couple and sometimes there are quite a few.




Repatriation Project Reveals Remarkable Story – Part 2: Telling the Story
~by Matthew Betts & Janet Young at Canadian Museum of History
I love how they collaborated with his people to tell his story.


~by Rob Cote at NFB (National Film Board of Canada)
It’s that time of year again, and some of these may remind you of your own time at school.  It must have been fairly cold the year the kids started kindergarten in the first film! I remember one year I bought all new fall and winter clothes for my kids before school started and it was too hot to wear them right into October!


Beyond Passwords
~at Snipette 
Posted by National Genealogical Society on FB
Interesting article on security- "from door-latches to iris-scans"




Wednesday, 30 August 2017

Canada 150 - Civil Registers of Quebec






During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.

Today I have for you...


Registres de l'état civil du Québec – BMD - Civil Registers of Quebec  


St Anthony, Montreal 1884-1912



BAnQ has a collection of civil registrations of births, marriages and deaths with images. There are not all years or all parishes, mostly small towns, but you may find a record you have been missing. You can browse by parish, district or region, then by year. I didn't look at them all, but most seem to have an index, making it easier to search.




Sunday, 27 August 2017

Kingston Trip - Part II: Discoveries




This may be a shock to some of my readers, but I have never physically done research at an archive or a library.  I have called to ask for look-ups and copies and am happy to say most people are very accommodating.  But because of many years of limited mobility and discomfort, it was not feasible for me to "go there", so all my research has been done by computer from the comfort of my easy chair. This past year has been one of marked improvement for me and I decided it's time to get off my butt.

I think the library is all I could handle first time out, so after leaving the beautiful Manor we headed to the Kingston Public Library to do some research. I was looking for specific information, and having contacted the library ahead of time, I knew to go to the Isabel Turner branch. The staff were very helpful, looking for what we needed and anything that could help with my ancestor stories. 

First we looked for the Tweedsmuir History Book for Pittsburgh Township. There was a whole section on "Greystone Manor" with the history since it was built by Colonel MacKenzie in 1817. I knew most of this, because a Kingston historian had replied to a query from my Uncle in 1969, giving him excerpts from this book. 




From little clues here and there, and the fact the Seales came from military roots, I suspected that John Seale came from Ireland to Canada as a soldier, but I could find no written proof. Until now. 

One entry I read about the manor said it had been owned or leased by soldiers for the next 60 years or so after being built. My great-great-grandfather was there for 60 years, 1832-1892

Then in the Index To The Upper Canada Land Books I found this entry:


John Seal (soldier), 28 Sept 1832


There I get three pieces of information in one. John was a soldier and 25 years old when he came to Canada, and now armed with info from this index I can find the original land transaction in the archives.

Looking at other documents in the same book I found that John added sublot 5 to their land in 1842, and there was an assessment for the land in 1891.

We looked through many interesting books about Pittsburgh Township and the village of Barriefield, and it was a great help having my daughter there to help. The next book of importance we found was the Index to Wills Probated, Frontenac County, Ontario, Canada, 1858-1973.  There I found John Seale, probated in 1892. A will is a gold mine! Now knowing where to look I can also obtain a copy of the will.  

One last thing we found was a genealogy book - The Seale Family History 1800-2000. This is about the Seales that settled in Morin Heights, Quebec, a different branch of the family.

I'm on a roll! But four hours research was all I could to at one time.  Now to find the house my grandfather (Pop) grew up in.

My great grandfather was a carpenter and the family lived at 82 Bagot Street, Kingston. This was the first ancestral property I found using Lisa Cooke's webinar on Google Earth. The numbers have all changed since those days, so I looked in the street directory in the 1891 city directory of Kingston: 82 Bagot is on the corner of Miller's Lane (named for my great grandmother's family) and before Raglan Road.


1891 Kingston Directory, pg 15



1908 fire insurance map



Miller's lane is still on Google maps and gps, although it is merely a driveway for the house and does not go through to the other street anymore. 




The current address is 490 Bagot Street.  I can now imagine my great grandparents and my Pop and his brothers posing for this photo in front of this house. 

  



The ground must have been lower then, as there were steps leading up to the veranda, and the window ledge is at George's shoulders.

The whole trip to Kingston - staying at the manor, the discoveries at the library and standing at my grandfather's house - was very emotional for me, after years of researching the family and the properties from afar. I was so happy my daughter wanted to share this experience with me.


Now to get cracking and find the documents that go with those indexes I found.