Wednesday, 15 November 2017

Canada 150 - Fire in Three Rivers 1856





During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.

Today I have for you...




The 1856 Fire in Three Rivers / Trois-Rivieres





Proceedings of a public meeting of the citizens of Three Rivers to discuss the calamitous fire that occurred November 15th, 1856. 
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With list including name of property owner affected, amount of loss, occupation of tenant, etc. 





Relevant Links

Sunday, 12 November 2017

Canada 150 - War Time Trade Board - Price Fixing






During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.

Today I have for you...




Report of The Wartime Prices and Trade Board 





The War Time Prices and Food Board was established at the beginning of the war, in 1939 to regulate not only the prices of food, but what food would be exported and what is kept at home for domestic use. The government publication explains how they chose which products to provide subsidies to keep the price low for the average consumer, and fixed maximum prices for others. I am using the following examples from the 1943 Report.





Rules were added, amended and revoked throughout the war, as were war taxes and duties on products. 

Besides food and other trade products, the Board had control over many services, such as plumbing, dressmaking, undertaking, harbour services, etc.. In 1941 all real property other than farm land was under the control of a board, including restaurants and room rentals. 





There is a Directory of Officials for the governing board and for the associated companies and local offices.





Relevant Links

Report of The Wartime Prices and Trade Board 1939-1946 w/ directory of officials

War Time Food Production Posters




Note:  The US had the War Industries Board. In Australia price fixing came under the War Precautions Act.



Friday, 10 November 2017

On the Road






We will be on the road for the next week. 





There will be no High Five post today or next Friday. I did schedule some Canada 150 posts and My Military Ancestor posts at my Challenges blog.

I'll be back!!

Dianne



Wednesday, 8 November 2017

Canada 150 - Long Point Settlement






During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.

Today I have for you...




Long Point Settlement, Norfolk Ontario






Settlers from Europe began arriving in this hamlet on the northern shores of Lake Erie around 1790. Loyalists began settling here after the American Revolution. 

There are genealogies and portraits of first settlers.




The Woodhouse Wesleyan Methodist Church (now a United Church) was built about 1800.






Relevant Links




Monday, 6 November 2017

Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen




I have quite a few railroad ancestors on my tree. Some were engineers, and a new-found husband of an ancestor was a locomotive fireman before later becoming an engineer. 

When John McTeer married Sarah Anne King, my grandmother's aunt, he was a locomotive fireman from Chaudiere Station, Quebec City, now working in Montreal for the Grand Trunk Railroad. 






In 1884 John McTeer was secretary for the Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen at the Montreal lodge. 




Sometime in 1888 John moved to Bisbee Arizona and became a locomotive engineer for the Arizona and South Eastern Railroad. 





In 1902 John McTeer moved back to Canada, at Limoilou, Quebec City, and was working for the Quebec & Lake St John Railway (owned by Canadian Northern). On 10 August 1914 John's train came to a bridge that he discovered too late was afire. The engine fell through, killing the fireman and injuring John. He died in hospital four days later.




I found in the 1914 issue of the Brotherhood magazine a Statement of Death and Disability Claims. (No mention of John McTeer though). There are more on the previous page with amounts of insurance.






In the UK it is the Associated Society of Locomotive Engineers and Firemen.



Relevant Links

Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen's Magazine










Sunday, 5 November 2017

Canada 150 - Manitoba Historical and Scientific Society






During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.

Today I have for you...



Manitoba Historical and Scientific Society





Reports of the Manitoba Historical and Scientific Society, Winnipeg was created in 1879. The annual reports hold lists of members.  Not all members live in Winnipeg, there is one who lived near my great-grandfather on Bagot Street in Kingston, Ontario.



Members are from all across Canada, with some in the US and other parts of the world.  









Friday, 3 November 2017

High fives - November 3, 2017





High Fives are articles or blog posts I have read during the week that I find interesting, and perhaps are pertinent to my research. Sometimes there are only a couple and sometimes there are quite a few.




~by guest Stephanie Pettigrew at Unwritten Histories
There were understandably many Halloween theme blog posts this week, but this one caught my attention! Witches “beyond Salem”


~by Marian B. Wood at Climbing My Family Tree
I remember when my brother was recuperating from an operation he needed something to do, so he dragged up his box of photos from the basement and scanned them all.  Once scanned he chucked the photos in the fire. I managed to salvage a couple of my faves. I see people posting online photos they have “rescued” and I always imagine someone seeing them and saying “Dam… I just chucked those!” What do YOU do with your scanned photos and unwanted items?


~by Campaspe Library at Campaspe Genealogy
There is always somewhere else to look. Case in point… I am ever thinking up places to look for something I have been searching for these past three years!


~by Euan Roger at The National Archives blog, UK
I didn’t know that about Chaucer.  What I did know is that his writing helped me solve a mystery about one of my ancestors. 








For more exciting weekend reading, see what posts these bloggers liked...

Saturday – Gail Dever, Crème de la Crème

Sunday – Randy Seaver, Best of the Genea-Blogs




Thursday, 2 November 2017

Canada 150 - CBC Digital Archives






During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.

Today I have for you...



Canadian Broadcasting Corp Digital Archives 
On This Day







On November 2, 1936 the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation replaced the Canadian Radio Broadcasting Commission. 

On the CBC Digital Archives website,  you can listen to radio broadcasts and see clips of news stories. Click On This Day, pick a month and scroll down the different days of the month to see an important event that happened on that day. Clicking on the day gives related stories at the bottom of the article. You can also choose by category, like under War and Conflict, choose First World War.

For December 9th there is a 1956 news clip of when Canada welcomed Hungarian refugees.  





One of these Hungarian children, Stefan, came to live at our house while his parents took time to establish themselves with work and a home. Stefan had a very hard time adapting to our customs while living with a strange family. He was with us well into spring, as I remember him helping me make a hole in our dirt road to play a game of marbles.



Relevant Links








Wednesday, 1 November 2017

Canada 150 - The Canadian Queen






During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.

Today I have for you...



The  Canadian Queen





The Canadian Queen ladies magazine started sometime in 1889. Besides fashion trends, art, literature and handy tips, they ran competitions in five categories. 






The Queen's Prize Problems questions and lists of winners were published in the magazine and in the principal newspapers.





The small print at the bottom stated that the winner was expected to renew her subscription for a year and to obtain at least two new subscriptions from her friends. 
The Daily British Whig in Kingston sometimes published portraits of the grand winner in their paper. The first place winner of the January 1892 historical question was Miss Eva Watson of Close Avenue, Toronto. 



"The young lady whose picture appears above is Miss Eva Watson, (66?)Close Ave, Toronto who has derived considerable of a reputation as the winner of The Canadian Queen's prize piano in their competition for January. Miss Watson being the one to send in the first correct reply. Miss Watson has received her piano and states to the reporter that she is delighted with it, it being one of Mason & Risch's fine-tuned up-rights, valued at $325 (?).The Queen's new Prize Problem will be announced in the principal daily papers on Saturday next." 


Relevant Links

The Canadian Queen(Periodical) 




Monday, 30 October 2017

Scottish Clans and Tartans



First things first.  Not all Scots belong to one of the big clans.  My Tait family were border reivers of Middle March. Although they had close ties with the Kerr family, many of whom were wardens of the area, the Taits were not of a clan. 






Secondly, some families were Septs of a clan. Septs are families that follow another family's chief. My Mavor ancestors were Septs of the Gordon clan of Aberdeenshire. The Septs could be tied by marriage, by land, or just proximity. Either way, there was safety in numbers.   

I see that some clans had more than one tartan - sort of like hockey jerseys, one for home and one for away, there were tartans for war and dress tartans. 






The Scottish Tartan Register was established by an act of parliament in 2008. On their website you can search or register a tartan. I have found that two people have registered tartans for the Tait name.






There are many filters to search by, including tartan name (which I used "Tait"), designer and colours, and more.




Relevant Links














    

Sunday, 29 October 2017

Canada 150 - Men's Wear Review






During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.

Today I have for you...





Men’s Wear Review






Throughout there are portraits of company and store owners or managers. 





Look for a personal section...





Relevant Links





Friday, 27 October 2017

High Fives - October 27, 2017




High Fives are articles or blog posts I have read during the week that I find interesting, and perhaps are pertinent to my research. Sometimes there are only a couple and sometimes there are quite a few.




~by Hillary Waterman at JSTOR Daily
Abracadabra and beyond!


~by Helen Barrell at Free UK Genealogy
The mysteries of Mistley  


~by Matthew Komus at The Official Blog of Heritage Winnipeg
The haunted halls of Winnipeg.


~by Haunted Montreal Blog
Read about Houdini's Montreal connection. 


~by Jenny Lawson at The Bloggess
This is the only blog I read that is not genealogy related, and this one I had to share.
I’ve always wanted to build a dollhouse, but Jenny takes it to a whole other level. This link is to the third post, so use the links in the first paragraph to see posts one and two.  






For more exciting weekend reading, see what posts these bloggers liked...

Saturday – Gail Dever, Crème de la Crème

Sunday – Randy Seaver, Best of the Genea-Blogs